Parenting Book Reviews

Top Buddhist Parenting Picks

Everyday Blessings:  The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting

Everyday Blessings:
The Inner Work Of Mindful Parenting

by Myla and Jon Kabat-Zinn

Parent's Tao Te Ching

 

The Parent's Tao Te Ching
by William Martin

Momma Zen

Momma Zen
by Karen Maezen Miller

More books for Buddhist Parents

Zen Parenting: The Art of Learning What You Already Know
by Judith Costello and Jurgen Haver. 2004
Buddha Mom
by Jacqueline Kramer
Buddhism for Mothers
by Sarah Napthali
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Compassion
by Marshall B. Rosenberg
Meditating with Children
by Deborah Rozman, PhD
The Accidental Buddhist: Mindfulness, Enlightenment and Sitting Still
by Dinty W. Moore

The following books may also be of interest to Buddhist parents.  Unfortunately I have not been able to review them as of yet.  If you have read any of these books and would like to contribute a review, please email

Family Dharma Connections: ( fd at pulelehuadesign.com )

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  Zen Meditations on Being a Mother
by Roni Jay (2000)
Sourcebooks Trade; Book and CD edition
How to Be an Adult in Relationships: The Five Keys to Mindful Loving
by David Richo, Kathlyn Hendricks
Shambhala Publications; 1st edition (2002)

Reviews & Descriptions

Momma Zen: Walking the Crooked Path of Motherhood
by Karen Maezen Miller. Shambhala (2006)

Combining humor, honesty, and plainspoken advice, Momma Zen distills the doubts and frustrations of parenting young children into vignettes of Zen wisdom. Drawing on her experience as a first-time mother, and on her years of Zen meditation and study, Miller explores how the daily challenges of parenthood can become the most profound spiritual journey of our lives. This compelling and wise memoir follows the timeline of early motherhood from pregnancy through toddlerhood. The book takes readers on a transformative journey, charting a mother’s growth beyond naive expectations and disorientation to finding fulfillment in ordinary tasks, developing greater self-awareness and acceptance—to the gradual discovery of what she calls “maternal bliss,” a state of abiding happiness and ease that is available to us all.

http://www.mommazen.com

Buddha Mom by Jacqueline Kramer Publisher: J. P. Tarcher. 2003

Zen Parenting: The Art of Learning What You Already Know by Judith Costello and Jurgen Haver published by Robins Lane Press, Beltsville, MD, 2004

This book covers various aspects of parenting. Each section has an excerpt or a few paragraph story followed by a the lesson and then a section on living the lesson. Some of these are exercises for parents and some are activties to share with children. Chapters include: Beginner's Mind, The Inadequacy Trap, Balancing the Opposites, Zen Discipline, Zen During Divorce, Day-to-Day Parenting, and more.

Buddhism for Mothers: A Calm Approach to Caring for Yourself and Your Children
by Sarah Napthali. Published by Allen & Unwin (2003)

 

Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Compassion by Marshall B. Rosenberg published by Puddle Dancer Press, Encinitas CA, 1999.

Review sent from Thea.

I just finished a wonderful book at the recommendation of the teachers and Director at my son's cooperative school. It is Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Compassion by Marshall B. Rosenberg (Puddle Dancer Press, Encinitas CA). Although not written specifically for parents or teachers, it presents both the underlying compassionate philosophy and concrete structure for learning to communicate -- both as speaker and listener -- in a way that puts aside judgement and opens up the heart for honest, productive communication even in very emotional or conflicted situations.

The teachers at our school have been putting this language into practice over the past year, and I've been amazed at the positive results, even with young children. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has ever felt that there must be a better way to find a path to agreement and caring in the midst of a stressful encounter (like getting your kids to clean their room!)


The Parent's Tao Te Ching : A New Interpretation Ancient Advice for Modern Parents by William Martin published by Marlow& Company, New York. 1999

Wonderfully inspiring rewrite of the ancient Tao Te Ching with parents in mind. A passage:

   Detach yourself from the seeming
   successes and failures of your children.
   By doing so you become able
   to be one with them at all times.
   You do not live your life 
   through you children.
   Therefore they are free
   to find their own true fulfillment.
Other reviews:

Dharma Family Treasures : Sharing Mindfulness with Children edited by Sandy Eastoak published by North Atlantic Books, 1994

Dharma Family Treasures is a collection of writings on the Dharma as related to family life. The book is divided into five parts: Parents Practicing, A Valid Path, The Children's Sangha, Simple Teachings and Honoring the Source. From the front page this thought: "Master: I have no tolerance for those who use their children as an excuse for not practicing Hermit: I have no tolerance for those who use their practice as an excuse for not parenting. Beggar: When we fully immerse ourselves in parenting as our practice, we answer the question, Of what use is it merely to enjoy this fleeting world? O sincere trainees, create no Dharma orphans. Quickly is dew gone from the grass. Quicker still are children grown"..........


Meditating with Children by Deborah Rozman, PhD published by Planetary Publications, second edition, 1994

 An excellant resource for anyone interested in teaching meditation skills to children. The book contains 10 lessons and about 15 different areas of meditation. I highly recommend it.


Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work Of Mindful Parenting by Myla and Jon Kabat-Zinn published by Hyperion, New York, 1997

An excellent book which should be read by every Buddhist parent. Myla and Jon Kabat have put together a wonderful
collection on mindful parenting.

Other Reviews:

Contents:

The Accidental Buddhist: Mindfulness, Enlightenment and Sitting Still by Dinty W. Moore, Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 1997

A fun and humorous look at one man's adventures in discovering Buddhism. In one of the last chapters, he talks about incorporating Buddhism and family life.



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